FAA calls new attention to older Piper PA–28 fuel selector valves

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A recent notice calls new attention to the operating and maintenance guidance included in a special airworthiness information bulletin issued in 2014 and directed at owners and operators of Piper models PA–28-140, PA–28-150, PA–28-160, PA–28-180, PA–28R-180, and PA–28R-200 airplanes. Photo by Mike Fizer.

A recent notice from the safety group calls new attention to the operating and maintenance guidance included in a special airworthiness information bulletin issued in 2014 and directed at owners and operators of Piper models PA–28-140, PA–28-150, PA–28-160, PA–28-180, PA–28R-180, and PA–28R-200 airplanes.

The SAIB notes concerns—called to the FAA’s attention by an accident—“that the fuel selector valve can be inadvertently switched off and/or may bind when switching fuel tanks and can cause a loss of power in flight.”

The FAA Safety Team noted in the October 9 reminder posted on its website that there has been “a long history” of addressing issues associated with the mechanism’s design.

AOPA reported on two such instances in August 2019: The FAA on August 5, 2019, issued an airworthiness concern sheet seeking information from operators of PA–28 aircraft of specific serial numbers on their experience with first-generation fuel selectors with a design that “does not include any protection against inadvertent disruption of the position of the lever from its intended position nor does it prevent over-rotation which could result in mistakenly selecting the OFF position when not intended.” (That ACS included a narrative of the history of previous service actions that had been taken to address fuel-selector valve concerns).

Our 2019 article also noted that in an unrelated action in 2018, the FAA had issued an airworthiness directive calling for inspection of some PA–28 fuel selector valve cover placards for correct positioning and allowing owners/operators who held at least a private pilot certificate to conduct the inspection.

This post was originally published by AOPA on . Please visit the original post to read the complete article.

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